Tony Garnett • Blog Posts

Mussolini

CBI and Mussolini

Has the CBI become a socialist pressure group? Maybe MI5 should infiltrate. Its boss, Caroline Fairbairn, should beware seductive undercover detectives.
She says “markets are not perfect” They fail in known and identified ways, particularly in skills, infrastructure and R and D investment. So she wants state funding to support innovation. After identifying each manufacturing sector, the government should have a plan of action to make them internationally competitive, just as it has with automobiles.
This is a welcome conversion to socialist common sense.

But hold on! This taxpayers money is to subsidise private corporations, so that it will pay dividends down the line in sales, exports, jobs and livelihoods. But there is no mention of profits. Does that mean privately owned companies do not wish to make profits any more? Or maybe the CBI in the present climate wants to hide its members’ true motive: make the taxpayer take the risks and the shareholders take the profits.

There’s no mention of taxpayer ownership in the CBI plan. Just taxpayer investment. No mention of democracy in the work place. Just corporatism, the partnership between private corporations and the State. That is Fascism; the extension of capitalism by other means. One pays lip service to market fundamentalism, but actually make the state apparatus the driver of private corporate power. Or, as we saw in the 30s, the opposite!
But Mussolini couldn’t be the model, could he?

Not even Mussolini without the nastiness. We have no state discipling of Trade Unions. No control over mass media. We’re democrats, after all. We’re free.
But what with the Tory Anti-Union legislation and the threats to the BBC, it looks more and more like Mussolini. After all, much of the ruling elite admired him, from Churchill, to Reith, to the Prince of Wales.
But we’d do it with an English face, of course. We do things differently here.
Boris perhaps? Too obvious?
Who do you think might be the figurehead?
Many are auditioning.

 The Day the Music Died is the memoir of BBC director and producer, Tony Garnett. For the first time, Tony shares exclusive details from his childhood in working-class and war torn Birmingham. He takes readers behind the scenes of a selection of his more famous productions, offering secrets and anecdotes. Some moving and some amusing. Now available to buy on Amazon.
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One Response so far.

  1. John Manix says:
    Tony,
    I’ve just read your blog on the “CBI and Mussolini”. I then tried to share it on FB and they say it has been blocked because of a complaint.
    I’ve already complained about them blocking you on earlier material after seeing your blog on FB today.

    Later on I’ll complain about your latest inoffensive blog. (Perhaps it was the Mussolini photo?)
    La lutte continue..
    Regards, John Manix

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